CBD FAQ

(frequently asked questions)

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CBD as a Product

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Usage

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Dosage

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Fringe Product & Safety

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Hemp Facts

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Body's Cannabinoids

cbd as a product

What is a broad-spectrum hemp or CBD product?

Broad spectrum CBD products will contain more than isolated CBD extract from the cannabis plant but will contain no THC.

As the cannabis plant goes through processing, chemical components are lost or removed. The cannabis extracts that are in a broad-spectrum product will vary depending on the strain of cannabis, and the degree of processing.

For example, a broad-spectrum product could contain CBD along with several other cannabinoids and terpenes, which are the molecules that give the plant its fragrance. It is important to note that there are no regulations in the cannabis industry that define broad spectrum products, so this label is somewhat unclear. In order to know what cannabis extracts are in a product, the consumer can read the Certificate of Analysis (COA).

What is a full-spectrum hemp or CBD product?

Full spectrum CBD products are similar to broad spectrum products, but they usually contain even more cannabis plant extracts (such as waxes and chlorophylls) and they can contain up to 0.3% THC.

The term “full spectrum” suggests that all of the components of the cannabis plant are in the product, but this is not true. The only product that will have the identical composition to the cannabis plant is the live plant. Drying, heating, and processing raw plant material in any way will change its composition. Again, it is important to note that there are no regulations in the cannabis industry that define full spectrum products, so this label is somewhat unclear. In order to know what cannabis extracts are in a product, the consumer can read the Certificate of Analysis (COA).

What is an isolate?

In contrast to full or broad-spectrum products, which contain more than one cannabis plant extract, an isolate contains a single extract. CBD isolate products don’t contain any other cannabinoids other than CBD.

There is also no THC found in Mana CBD isolate. This can be a good product for people to use if they are new to using CBD, or who want a higher or more repeatable/predictable dose of CBD.

How does a broad-spectrum CBD work in your body vs an isolated CBD product?

CBD isolate products only contain CBD, while broad spectrum CBD products will contain CBD along with several other cannabinoids and possibly terpenes – the molecules that give the plant its fragrance. Neither CBD isolate nor broad spectrum products will contain THC. It is assumed that each compound in the product will exert an effect, and/or that compounds will interact synergistically, but precisely how this happens is unclear for two reasons.

First, the cannabis extracts that are in a broad-spectrum product will vary depending on the strain of cannabis and the degree of processing. Given the wide diversity in the chemical composition of different cannabis strains, it’s impossible to provide a general statement that describes how a broad-spectrum CBD product will work in the body.

Second, because most pre-clinical and clinical research has been done using CBD isolates, or CBD combined with only THC, there is a lack of evidence that describes how different cannabis-derived compounds will interact. This issue is not likely to be resolved soon, as the wide variability in the chemistry of different cannabis strains make it very difficult to experimentally assess different combinations.

While broad spectrum CBD products are widely promoted as being superior to isolates because of the entourage effect, the evidence for this is limited since research studies have not directly compared the two. Because CBD is the dominant phytocannabinoid in both isolate and broad-spectrum products, the difference in effects may or may not be significant. The best way to assess your response to different products is to keep a daily record of your symptoms.

How does a broad-spectrum CBD work in your body vs an isolated CBD product?

Solubility refers to a products ability to dissolve in water. Oil (also known as lipid or fat) soluble CBD products are oily, and do not dissolve in water. Water soluble products are fine powders and do dissolve in water.

The difference in these two products affects bioavailability, with water soluble products being both more bioavailable and more consistently bioavailable than oil soluble products. Studies have shown that only about 6-24% of oil soluble CBD ends up in the bloodstream. In contrast, water soluble CBD is up to 4.5 times more bioavailable than an oil soluble CBD.

usage & dosage

What is the best way to get started with CBD?

Should you decide to try CBD, the general rule is to “start low and go slow.” When using CBD to help symptoms and improve health, it’s advisable to establish a routine that involves taking the product at approximately the same time each day and recording how you feel.

You can expect that each dose of orally ingested CBD will last up to approximately 6 hours. Water soluble CBD does not need to be taken with food and takes effect quickly 10-15 minutes. Oil soluble CBD should be taken with food a delayed effect anywhere from 1-4 hours. Based on this, you can determine what schedule and timing are appropriate for you and plan accordingly.

If an effect is not observed at a dose of 30mg, this dose could be increased. Track your symptoms and intake of CBD carefully so that you know how your body is responding. You will only need to take more if you don’t see an improvement when you track symptoms. It isn’t recommended to start with more than 30mg, as this might cause you to mistake your optimal dose as being higher than it really is.

Change can be immediate or gradual and there are many factors that can affect how you are feeling or sleeping.

Should I start with an isolate or a broad-spectrum product?

Experimenting with different products while carefully tracking your symptoms will help you to know what works best for you. Using this approach, it makes sense to start with an isolate first, and then use a broad spectrum second. That way you can tell if a broad spectrum offers you an additive effect.

Most clinical research has been done using isolated CBD. Because of this design, research supports the use of an isolate, but it is very possible that broad spectrums would have the same (or perhaps better) effects if they were studied under the same conditions. We tend to instinctively think that products that contain “more” (such as broad-spectrum CBD products) will be better than those that contain “less” (such as isolated CBD products) but this is not necessarily the case.

How much should I take?

Finding the perfect dose of CBD is not an exact science, it’s personal.

Starting at a dose of around 30mg of CBD is recommended, and if an effect is not observed, this dose could be increased. We recommend tracking symptoms carefully at the 30mg dose for a month. The general rule in cannabinoid dosing is to “start low and go slow.” Ultimately, you want to take the least amount needed for the desired effect.

The question of dosing is complicated by the fact that clinical research has only explored a very limited range of doses, and almost always uses oil/lipid soluble CBD which has a low bioavailability. Note that 30mg of water-soluble CBD will be equivalent to a higher dose of oil soluble CBD.

Will I get high?

No. CBD isolate and broad-spectrum products are not psychoactive.

When should I take CBD?

When using CBD to treat symptoms and improve health, it’s advisable to establish a routine that involves taking the product at approximately the same time each day and recording how you feel. You can expect that each dose of orally ingested CBD will last up to approximately 6 hours. Water soluble CBD does not need to be taken with food, while oil soluble CBD should be taken with food. Based on this, you can determine what schedule and timing are appropriate for you and plan accordingly.

Should I take more?

You will only need to take more if you don’t see an improvement when you track symptoms. It isn’t recommended to start with more than 30mg, as this might cause you to mistake your optimal dose as being higher than it really is (and therefore require you to spend more money on product than you need to).

What is bioavailability?

Bioavailability refers to how much of a product gets into the blood, and ultimately has an effect. Bioavailability varies depending on how a product is ingested and how it is manufactured. Not all of the product that gets ingested will be absorbed into the body. In fact, in some orally ingested products, less than 10% will end up in the blood. This is an important consideration when it comes to choosing products and doses.

How is using a topical CBD different from an ingested CBD product?

Topical CBD products are applied directly to the skin and are minimally absorbed into the deeper tissues. Topical products also undergo very minimal absorption into the bloodstream (if any). Topical CBD products will provide superficial and local effects but will not pass into the blood to affect distant tissues. This is the main difference between topical CBD and orally ingested products, which are absorbed into the body and distributed in the systemic circulation.

For patients who are using CBD to treat multiple conditions (for example, anxiety and neuropathic pain), combining topical and orally ingested CBD could provide greater benefit than using a single product.

Do I take CBD with or without food?

Oil soluble CBD should be taken with food for better absorption. Water soluble CBD can be taken with or without food.

How do I know when CBD is working?

You should monitor the symptoms that you are trying to help. The best way to do this is to keep a daily record of your symptoms and intake of CBD products. Review this every few days to see how you are responding. Be specific: if you are trying to improve sleep, record the time you go to bed, the time you wake up, the number of nighttime awakenings, and the quality of your sleep. It takes some effort to do this but it’s really important to get a clear understanding of what is happening in your body.

Everyone experiences results from CBD differently, but common results reported include feeling more relaxed, reduced anxiety, sleeping more deeply, a “quieter mind,” and reduced pain.

Is CBD considered safe?

CBD is considered to be a very safe product. In November 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that CBD in humans exhibits no evidence for abuse or dependence potential, and that there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.

CBD is also not addictive and does not cause withdrawal symptoms, even at very high doses up to 750mg. Adverse events are minimal, even at doses of several hundred milligrams per day. The most common adverse events at high doses are decreased appetite, diarrhea, and sleepiness.

I heard I needed to have the Entourage effect with my CBD product?

The entourage effect states that products that contain more of the cannabis plant extracts have a more potent effect than isolated extracts because these plant extracts will work together. While this may be true for some people and some conditions, there is currently isn’t much research that demonstrates how the components of cannabis work together.

In fact, the bulk of research to date has been done with either isolated THC, isolated CBD, or a combination of THC and CBD. You may want to experiment with an isolate first and then a full or broad-spectrum product. Be sure to carefully track your symptoms using both products. This way you will know what product works best for you.

Are there any potential side effects?

Adverse events or side effects are minimal, even at doses of several hundred milligrams per day. The most common adverse events at high doses are decreased appetite, diarrhea, and sleepiness.

Will CBD show up on a drug test?

No. Drug tests measure a metabolite of THC in the urine.

However, a recent study found that many CBD products on the market are contaminated with THC. This makes it very important to look at the COA of a product to ensure that THC is being tested for, and that it is non-detectable. Full spectrum CBD products may contain small amounts (less than 0.3%) of THC, but this is so low that it should not show up on a drug test, although again, it is important to ensure THC levels are below 0.3% by reviewing a COA.

How do I know if I am taking too much CBD?

There are very few adverse events associated with CBD intake; however, if you do experience an unpleasant side effect, that is an indication that you would want to reduce your level of intake. For example, higher doses of CBD may be sedative for some people, while lower doses promote wakefulness. Tracking how you feel, and the timing and dose of CBD intake will help you to know how your body is responding. It is important to “start low and go slow” so that you know how your body responds to different levels of intake and can take the level that is optimal for you.

Do I need to consult my doctor before I take Fringe CBD products?

It is advisable to consult with a knowledgeable health care provider who has experience using medical CBD before taking Fringe products.

Is there a cumulative benefit of use? (Effects built with a consistent and prolonged use)

Whether CBD is cumulative has not been investigated in research studies. However, some of the benefits observed may certainly appear to be cumulative. For example, since CBD reduces inflammation, progressive and cumulative decreases in inflammation will be experienced over time.

Can I build up a tolerance to CBD?

There is no evidence that people build up a tolerance to CBD.

Is it safe for people who take medications?

Due to federal regulations, we are not able to comment on drug interactions. We recommend you speak with your healthcare provider.

Does CBD make you hungry?

The majority of research suggests that CBD does not make you hungry. The increased appetite associated with cannabis consumption is caused by THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis, interacting with CB1 receptors in the brain. CBD does not interact with these receptors in the same way.

In fact, a 2009 study in rats found that CBD (while not affecting hunger when taken on its own) was able to reduce the increase in appetite induced by activation of the CB1 receptor. However, in a recent survey of medical CBD users, a small percentage (6.35%) of CBD users reported increased appetite, so it is possible that this is a side effect experienced by minority of users.

Can you take CBD products while pregnant?

Recent studies have reported that many women are using CBD during pregnancy for nausea, anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. However, there is currently limited research regarding the safety of CBD during pregnancy, and the FDA position is that there are no comprehensive research studies that explore the effects of CBD on the developing fetus or pregnant mother. Cannabinoids do cross the placental barrier and the cannabinoid system plays an important role in pregnancy. As such, the FDA suggests against the use of CBD during pregnancy.

Can you take CBD products while breastfeeding?

There is currently limited research regarding the safety of CBD during breastfeeding, and the FDA position is that there are no comprehensive research studies that explore the effects of CBD on the developing infant. Cannabinoids do pass from the mother into breastmilk, and the cannabinoid system plays an important role in early development. As such, the FDA suggests against the use of CBD when breastfeeding.

fringe product & safety

Are all CBD products safe?

To ensure you are taking a well manufactured CBD product, make sure that there is a QR code on your product linking it to a Certificate of Analysis (COA). This COA lab report confirms the safety of the product. You should see that the product has been testing for heavy metals, pesticides, microbials, and residual solvents. 

Are there any potential side effects?

Adverse events or side effects are minimal, even at doses of several hundred milligrams per day. The most common adverse events at high doses are decreased appetite, diarrhea, and sleepiness.

How are Fringe CBD Powders Made?

Fringe water soluble CBD powder is made in five steps.

First, the hemp plant is cultivated, and the leaves and flowers are harvested and dried. The leaves and flowers are the parts of the hemp plant that contain the highest concentrations of cannabinoids. The hemp used to make Fringe products is certified organic and non-GMO.

Second, the leaves and flowers are ground up with a solvent into a biomass. The solvent pulls the cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids from the biomass and separates them from unwanted material like fiber.

Third, the solvent extract goes through the process of “winterization,” which further purifies it and leaves an oil residue, and the solvent is recovered.

Fourth, the oil residue is distilled to separate the compounds in the oil, based on their boiling points.

Finally, the product is processed into a water-soluble powder by creating tiny particles that are surrounded by maltodextrin.

Fringe makes both a CBD isolate (containing only CBD) and a broad-spectrum CBD (containing CBD, CGG, CBDV, and CBN).

Testing for potency and contamination takes place at three points: (1) on the biomass, (2) prior to distillation, and (3) after the final product is manufactured.

What is a Certificate of Analysis?

A Certificate of Analysis (COA) is a document that displays the results of an analysis of the chemical composition of a product. A COA will present the cannabinoid composition of the product as well as other cannabis derived compounds such as terpenes.

A comprehensive COA will also look for things that you don’t want in a product, including microbes (such as salmonella and e.coli), heavy metals, pesticides, and solvents. The COA will provide you with details about the composition of broad and full spectrum products and will help you to ensure that the product is safe for consumption.

Some companies do not present a COA at all, while others only provide COA’s for cannabinoid and terpene composition. Be sure to look for a COA that includes testing for contaminants. Because hemp is a “remediation” crop, it has the ability to extract heavy metals and pollutants from the soil. This is great for cleaning the soil, but these are not things that you want to put into your body.

COA’s should be created for every batch of product that is produced, as well as for every end product. Your product should have a QR code on it that is linked to a COA.

What is Maltodextrin?

Maltodextrin is a white powder made from a carbohydrate source. The source of maltodextrin in Fringe water soluble CBD is non-GMO corn.

There is approximately ¾ g of maltodextrin in Mana and Henko, which would provide around 3 Calories of energy. Maltodextrin is a polysaccharide, comprised of a chain of 3-19 glucose molecules, and is a complex carbohydrate. Maltodextrin is easily digestible and is naturally produced by digestion of starch in the small intestine. Maltodextrin is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is gluten free. The maltodextrin surrounds the nano-particles of CBD, which is a lipid, and makes them water soluble.

Where is Fringe made?

Fringe is manufactured in the US.

hemp facts

What is hemp?

“Hemp” refers to the non-intoxicating (less than 0.3% THC) strain of the Cannabis sativa L plant. While hemp and cannabis come from the same plant species, they have different genetics and cannabinoid profiles. Hemp is rich in the non-euphoric cannabidiol (CBD), while cannabis produces mostly psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

What is hemp oil?

Hemp oil is extracted from the stalks, leaves, and flowers of the hemp plant. It will contain CBD and is typically referred to as full spectrum hemp oil or cannabidiol oil.

What is hemp seed oil?

Unlike full spectrum hemp oil, Hemp seed oil is made from the seeds of the Cannabis sativa plant and does not contain CBD or other cannabinoids.

What is CBD?

CBD, or cannabidiol, is a component of the cannabis plant. Cannabis that is high in CBD (and has THC levels below 0.3%) is referred to as “hemp.” CBD is a chemical that acts on an important system in our body called the endocannabinoid system (ECS).

CBD does not have a psychoactive effect, meaning it does not make you feel “high.”

The ECS has an important role in regulating balance in our bodies, and CBD has been found by doctors, scientists, and patients to have a positive effect on things like pain, inflammation, and anxiety.

Is CBD legal?

CBD has been legal in the US since 2018.

What is THC?

Like CBD, THC, or Δ-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, also comes from the cannabis plant. Cannabis sativa L strains that are high in THC are scientifically referred to as “cannabis,” while strains with less than 0.3% THC are referred to as “hemp.” Like CBD, THC is a chemical that acts on the endocannabinoid system, but unlike CBD, it does have a psychoactive effect.

Is THC legal?

THC is currently federally illegal, but it has been legalized for medical as well as recreational use in many states. You can check the legal status of THC in your state here: https://disa.com/map-of-marijuana-legality-by-state.

body’s cannabinoids

What is the endocannabinoid system (ECS)?

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is known as the “Ur-regulator,” or “master modulator” in the body. The main ECS functions have been described as: “eat, sleep, relax, protect, and forget.” It has been implicated in virtually all of the important functions in the body, including glucose and lipid metabolism, food intake regulation, immune homeostasis, respiratory health, inflammation, cancer, and other physiological and pathological states.

The classical ECS is comprised of the endocannabinoids AEA and 2-AG, their receptors, and the enzymes involved in their synthesis and degradation. A related system is the “endocannabinoidome,” which can be thought of as the extended ECS. The endocannabinoidome includes the classical ECS as well as additional endocannabinoids, receptors, and enzymes that are biochemically related to the ECS. The ECS and endocannabinoidome are very complex, and we have only scratched the surface of our understanding of how they work.

What are endocannabinoids?

Endocannabinoids, or endogenous cannabinoids, are molecules that are made in the body and interact with receptors in the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The two main endogenous cannabinoids are anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), although additional endocannabinoids have been identified.

Both AEA and 2-AG are derived from arachidonic acid, which is an omega-6 fatty acid, while other endocannabinoids are derived from fatty acids including omega-3 and omega-9. The endocannabinoids are found throughout the body and help to regulate activity in multiple systems.

What are phytocannabinoids?

Phytocannabinoids are molecules that interact with the ECS that are derived from cannabis sativa. The two major phytocannabinoids are cannabidiol (CBD) and D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In addition, there are over 100 minor phytocannabinoids.

The most well-known include cannabigerol (CBG), cannabidivarin (CBDV), cannabinol (CBN), cannabichromene (CBC), and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). Phytocannabinoids are found in a variety of chemical forms, including acidic and varinic, and they vary in their affinity and binding modes for cannabinoid receptors. Very little is known about most of the phytocannabinoids, except for CBD and THC, although this is an increasing focus of research investigation.

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